Faculty

Eugene Cross
Eugene Cross

EUGENE CROSS is the author of the short story collection "Fires of Our Choosing," which was long listed for the Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award, and was named the Gold Medal winner in the Short Story category by the Independent Publisher Book Awards. His stories have or will appear in Glimmer Train, Narrative Magazine, American Short Fiction, Story Quarterly, TriQuarterly, and Callaloo, among other publications. His work was also listed among the 2010 Best American Short Stories' 100 Distinguished Stories. He is the recipient of scholarships from the Chautauqua Writers' Festival and the Bread Loaf Writers’ Conference, as well as fellowships from Yaddo and the Sewanee Writers' Conference. He can be found online at www.eugenecross.com

Garin Cycholl

Garin Cycholl’s recent work has appeared with Admit2Rain TaxiExquisite Corpse, New American Writing, and Seven Corners.  He is author of Blue Mound to 161 (winner of the 2003 Transcontinental Prize), NightbirdsLevitations, and Raeftown Georgics.  Since 2002, he has been a member of Chicago’s Jimmy Wynn fiction collaborative.

Paul Durica

Paul Durica has an MFA in Creative Writing from the University of Michigan and is a PhD candidate in the Department of English Language & Literature at the University of Chicago. His writing has appeared in Tin House, Indiana Review, and Mid-American Review among other places and is forthcoming in ACM and The Chicagoan. He is the founder of Pocket Guide to Hell, a series of tours and reenactments that have been written about in the New York Times, Huffington Post, ReadyMade, and Vice. He lives in Chicago with his two cats.

Michelle Falkoff

Michelle Falkoff's fiction and reviews have been published in ZYZZYVA, DoubleTake, and the Harvard Review, among other places.  She is the author of the young adult novel Playlist for the Dead, forthcoming from HarperCollins in 2015.  She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and currently serves as Director of Communication and Legal Reasoning at Northwestern University School of Law.

Baird Harper
Baird Harper

Baird Harper’s fiction has appeared in Glimmer Train Stories, Tin House, The Chicago Tribune, Mid-American Review, Another Chicago Magazine, CutBank, and Printers Row Journal. His stories have been anthologized in Best New American Voices 2009 and 2010, and won the 2009 James Jones Fiction Contest and the 2010 Nelson Algren Award. He holds an M.A. in English from the University of Montana and an M.F.A. in Writing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Currently living in Oak Park with his wife and two kids, he teaches writing at Loyola University and The University of Chicago.

David MacLean
David MacLean

David S. MacLean was named the Best Emerging Non-Fiction Writer by the PEN/American Society in 2011. He is a graduate of The University of Houston (PhD), New Mexico State University (MFA), and Warren Wilson College (BA). He was a Fulbright Scholar in India and a co-founder of the Poison Pen Reading Series in Houston, TX. His essays and stories have been published in Ploughshares, Guernica, Quarterly West, Gulf Coast, and featured on the radio program, This American Life. His memoir The Answer to the Riddle is Me will be published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt in Fall 2013.

Mickle Maher
Mickle Maher

Mickle Maher is a cofounder of Chicago’s Theater Oobleck and the author of numerous plays, including An Apology for the Course and Outcome of Certain Events Delivered by Doctor John Faustus on This His Final Evening, and The Hunchback Variations. Recent plays include The Strangerer, Spirits to Enforce (Theater Oobleck),Cyrano (translator) and The Cabinet (Redmoon Theater), and Lady Madeline (Steppenwolf). His plays have appeared Off-Broadway and in numerous theaters around the world. He is published by Hope and Nonthings. He has been the recipient of a Creative Capital grant (for The Strangerer) and, recently, an NEA grant to develop his Hunchback Variations into an opera. He currently teaches at the University of Chicago.

Jeff McMahon
Jeff McMahon

Jeff McMahon covers green technology, energy and the environment for Forbes, the publication with the largest digital audience in America. His work is also syndicated in the Chicago Tribune. He has been a reporter and columnist for daily newspapers, alternative weeklies, and innovators in online journalism including The New York Times Company's Lifewire syndicate and The Weather Channel's climate change site, Forecast Earth. A specialist in environmental reporting, he has won dozens of awards for news writing and commentary, including top honors from the National Society of Newspaper Columnists. A graduate of Chicago's Master of Arts Program in the Humanities, he is a founding editor, along with other MAPH alumni, of Contrary magazine. He also serves as MAPH's writing advisor.

Peter O'Leary
Peter O'Leary

Peter O’Leary graduated from the College and the Divinity School. He has published three books of poetry, Watchfulness (Sputen Duyvil), Depth Theology (Georgia), and Luminous Epinoia (Cultural Society), as well as a book of literary criticism, Gnostic Contagion: Robert Duncan & the Poetry of Illness (Welseyan). As Ronald Johnson’s literary executor, he has edited three books: To Do As Adam Did: Selected Poems (Talisman), The Shrubberies (Flood), and Radi os (Flood). Two new Ronald Johnson books, The Outworks and a new edition of ARK are both forthcoming from Flood. Likewise, a selected poems of John Taggart, Is Music, which he edited, has been published by Copper Canyon. He is a longtime editor of LVNG, an advisory editor for the Cultural Society, and an integral member of the Chicago Poetry Project.

Dan Raeburn

Daniel Raeburn is the author of The Imp, a series of booklets about underground cartoonists. He also wrote the book Chris Ware. His other essays and memoirs have appeared in The BafflerTim House, and the New Yorker. He has received fellowships from the MacDowell Colony, the Vermont Studio Center, and the National Endowment for the Arts.  He earned his BA at the University of Iowa and his MFA from Bennington College.

Srikanth Reddy
Srikanth Reddy

Srikanth Reddy is the author of two books of poetry--"Facts for Visitors" (University of California Press, 2004) and "Voyager" (University of California Press, 2011) --as well as a scholarly study, "Changing Subjects: Digressions in Modern American Poetry" (Oxford University Press, 2012).  His poems have appeared in various journals, including APR, Grand Street, Fence, and Ploughshares, and his critical writing has been featured in publications such as the New Republic, Raritan, and American Literature. He has held fellowships from the Mellon Foundation, the Whiting Foundation (in the Humanities), and the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing. A graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and the doctoral program in English at Harvard University, Reddy is an Assistant Professor in English and at the College.

Augustus Rose
Gus Rose

A native of San Francisco, Augustus Rose's fiction and non-fiction have been published in The Berkeley Fiction Review, Readymade Magazine, Publishers Weekly, and F Magazine, where he won the Novel-in-Progress Award. He has received fellowships from the Squaw Valley Writers' Conference and the Eastern Frontier Society Foundation. He earned his MA in creative writing at UC Davis and currently teaches fiction writing at University of Chicago and Columbia College Chicago.

Jessica 
Savitz
Jessica 
Savitz

Jessica Savitz is a graduate of Kenyon College and Iowa Writer's Workshop. She was the inaugural winner of Madeleine P. Plonsker Emerging Writer's Residency Prize, and Lake Forest College Press published her book Hunting is Painting. Savitz lives in Evanston with her husband, Michael, and their two wondrous daughters, Eugenia and Aurelia. 

Jennifer Scappettone

Jennifer Scappettone is a poet, translator, and scholar, the author of the poetry collection From Dame Quickly (Litmus, 2009) and of several chapbooks: Beauty [Is the New Absurdity] (dusi/e chap kollektiv, 2007), Err-Residence (Bronze Skull, 2007), and Thing Ode / Ode oggettuale (La Camera Verde, 2008), translated into Italian in dialogue with Marco Giovenale. Exit 43, an archaeology of the landfill and opera of pop-up pastorals, is in progress for Atelos Press, with a letterpress fragment forthcoming from Compline Press. She edited and translated Locomotrix: Selected Poetry and Prose of Amelia Rosselli (University of Chicago Press, 2012), which won the Academy of American Poets' biennial Raiziss/De Palchi Book Award. She edited Belladonna Elders Series #5:  Poetry, Landscape, Apocalypse (Belladonna, 2009), featuring her pop-ups and prose and new writing by Etel Adnan and Lyn Hejinian. Her poetry is featured in a range of anthologies, including Novas Poéticas de Resistência/Poetics of Resistance, edited by Graça Capinha, Emergency Index, a documentary performance anthology (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2012), La alteración del silencio: Poesía norteamericana reciente (Das Kapital, 2010), and The Best American Poetry 2004 (Scribner, 2004). Recent collaborative projects include sonic performances of Exit 43 with the Difforme Ensemble (Marco Ariano, Renato Ciunfrini, Roberto Fega); the performance work PARK, under development with choreographer Kathy Westwater and architect Seung Jae Lee and presented in 2010-12 at Dance Theater Workshop, Reed College, LentSpace, and Fresh Kills Landfill; and X Locus, twinned installations for the courtyard and tract of Trajan’s aqueduct at the American Academy in Rome, designed with AGENCY Architecture (Ersela Kripa and Stephen Mueller) and composer Paul Rudy, in 2011. Killing the Moonlight: Modernism in Venice, her critical study of the premodern city as a crucible for twentieth-century experimentation across literature, politics, the visual arts, architecture, and urbanism, is forthcoming from Columbia University Press.

Vu Tran

Vu Tran’s fiction has appeared in the O. Henry Prize Stories, the Best American Mystery Stories, A Best of Fence, The Southern Review, Harvard Review, and other publications.  He has received honors from Glimmer Train Stories and the Michigan Quarterly Review, and is a recipient of a 2009 Whiting Writers’ Award and a 2011 Finalist Award for the Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise.  His first novel, This Or Any Desert, is forthcoming from WW Norton.  Born in Vietnam and raised in Oklahoma, Vu received his MFA from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop and his PhD from the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, where he was a Glenn Schaeffer Fellow in fiction at the Black Mountain Institute.  

Amaia Gabantxo

Amaia Gabantxo is a writer, a flamenco singer and literary translator specialized in Basque literature who graduated from the renowned MA in Literary Translation at the University of East Anglia, Norwich, in the UK. She currently teaches Basque language and literature and creative writing at the University of Chicago. She is the most prolific translator of Basque literature to date, as well as a pioneer in the field. She has published and performed her work on both sides of the Atlantic: in Ireland and Great Britain, the countries in which she carried out her university education, and in the US, where she has lived for the last two years. As well as being a Wingate Scholar, she has been a head chef in a Basque restaurant, run backpackers’ hostels in Ireland, sung flamenco in Norwich Cathedral, read at the Edinburgh Book Festival, the Dublin Writers’ Festival and the Royal Festival Hall in London and been a regular contributor to the Times Literary Supplement (UK). She has translated works by most canonical Basque authors, and even a hybrid, avant-garde cookbook/ food-inspired literature and music book by gastronomic genius Andoni Aduriz, owner and head chef at Mugaritz, the internationally renowned Basque restaurant. Her latest literary project, an anthology that brings together the best Basque poetry of the last 100 years, is due for publication in the UK in 2014. She is currently involved in a hybrid literary/musical/performance art project, Palo a Palo, which combines flamenco song and dance with butoh and spoken word (in the form of translations and original work), and performs regularly as a flamenco singer in venues all over Chicago.

Amaia Gabantxo treats texts as archeological sites from which each individual writer unearths the morsel, the thing that speaks to them the most, and from which their truest, best writing voice is sure to emerge. In this way, the ‘original’ text becomes not a constraint but, rather, a platform from which to aim higher. She developed this philosophy (which applies to the courses she currently offers at the University of Chicago), when she devised and taught the postgraduate course ‘Translation as Experiment’ at the University of East Anglia, offered to students of the renowned Masters in Creative Writing and Literary Translation. 

John Wilkinson
John Wilkinson

John Wilkinson's most recent books of poetry are Reckitt's Blue (2013) and Down to Earth (Salt 2008). Born in London and educated at Cambridge, he worked in mental health services in the industrial West Midlands, South Wales and the East End of London before moving to the University of Notre Dame as Writer in Residence in 2005. He joined the English Department at Chicago in 2010. As well as nine books of poetry and several chapbooks, he has also published a critical collection, The Lyric Touch (Salt 2007) and critical essays on modernist and contemporary British and American poetry.

Leila Wilson
Leila Wilson

Leila Wilson's The Hundred Grasses is forthcoming from Milkweed Editions. Her poems have appeared in A Public Space, Denver Quarterly, Poetry, The Canary, and elsewhere. She is the recipient of a Friends of Literature Prize from the Poetry Foundation and an Academy of American Poets College Prize. She received her MFA from Indiana University and her MA from University of Chicago. A former editor at Chicago Review, she teaches at the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.