Visiting Faculty

Brian Booker

Brian Booker’s debut story collection, Are You Here for What I’m Here For?, is forthcoming from Bellevue Literary Press in 2016.  He holds an M.F.A. from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, where he was an Iowa Arts Fellow, and a Ph.D. in English from NYU.  His fiction has been published in The Antioch Review, Conjunctions, New England Review, One Story, Tin House, Vice, and other magazines.  Brian has been a fiction fellow at the Fine Arts Work Center in Provincetown and at the Wisconsin Institute for Creative Writing.  He grew up in Bethesda, Maryland.

Garin Cycholl

Garin Cycholl’s recent work has appeared with Admit2Rain TaxiExquisite Corpse, New American Writing, and Seven Corners.  He is author of Blue Mound to 161 (winner of the 2003 Transcontinental Prize), NightbirdsLevitations, and Raeftown Georgics.  Since 2002, he has been a member of Chicago’s Jimmy Wynn fiction collaborative.

Michelle Falkoff

Michelle Falkoff is the author of the young adult novels Playlist for the Dead, which was one of NPR's Great Reads of 2015, and Pushing Perfect, published in 2016. She is a graduate of the Iowa Writers' Workshop and currently serves as Director of Communication and Legal Reasoning at Northwestern University School of Law.

Amaia Gabantxo

Amaia Gabantxo is a writer, a flamenco singer and literary translator specialized in Basque literature. She currently teaches creative writing at the University of Chicago, and performs regularly in venues all over Chicago. She is the most prolific translator of Basque literature to date, as well as a pioneer in the field, and has received multiple awards for her work; most recently, the OMI Writers Translation Lab award, a Mellon Fellowship for Arts and Scholarship, and a year long artist-in-residence award at the Cervantes Institute in Chicago. She has published and performed on both sides of the Atlantic: in Ireland and Great Britain, the countries in which she carried out her university education, and in the US, where she has lived for the last five years.

She is currently involved in three hybrid literary/musical/performance art projects. Soniché, where she performs with classical musicians in ensembles that hybridize flamenco and classical traditions; the Lorca Project, which thanks to the Mellon Fellowship, will bring together flamenco artists and a multidisciplinary group of academics in a project that will aim to come up with new English translations of Lorca’s poetry, and to ‘translate’ Lorca’s poetry into a variety of media; and Almas, a collaboration with Iranian-American poet Sholeh Wolpé and ‘tar player Sahba Motallebi that brings together Iranian and flamenco music, Lorca’s songs, and new interpretations of Lorca and Attar’s poetry.

Her latest literary translations, due to be published in late 2016 and in 2017, include Twist by Harkaitz Cano for Archipelago Books in NY, A Glass Eye by Miren Agur Meabe for Parthian Books in the UK, and two seminal collections by the father of modern Basque poetry, Gabriel Aresti, Soul & Soil and Downhill, for the University of Nevada Press.

Goldie Goldbloom

Goldie Goldbloom is the author of two novels, The Paperbark Shoe (Picador) - a Best Novel of the Year (IndieFab) and winner of the AWP Novel Award - and Gwen (forthcoming), as well as two collections of short stories, You Lose These (Fremantle Press) and The Grief of the Body (forthcoming). Her work has been selected for the Best Australian Short Stories, and has been published in journals such as The Kenyon Review, Prairie Schooner, and Narrative. She holds an MFA from Warren Wilson and has taught at Northwestern University ever since being named the Simon Blattner Fellow. She is the recipient of a NEA Fellowship, a Brown Foundation-Dora Maar House Fellowship, a Jerusalem Post Prize, and a Rona Jaffe Fellowship, amongst other honours. Goldbloom is an international speaker of note, most recently as an honored guest at the Assises Internationales du Roman, in Lyon, France. She was a founding board member of an advocacy organization for at-risk LGBTQ minorities and is the writer of the oral history blog Frum Gay Girl.

Baird Harper

Baird Harper’s fiction has appeared in Glimmer Train Stories, Tin House, Prairie Schooner, StoryQuarterly, The Chicago Tribune, Mid-American Review, Another Chicago Magazine, CutBank, Carve, and Printers Row Journal. His stories have been anthologized in the 2009 and 2010 editions of Best New American Voices, New Stories from the Midwest 2016, and 40 Years of CutBank, and have won the 2014 Raymond Carver Short Story Contest, the 2010 Nelson Algren Award, and the 2009 James Jones Fiction Contest. His first book, Red Light Run, was published by Scribner in 2017. He holds an M.A. in English from the University of Montana and an M.F.A. in Writing from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Nathan Hoks
Nathan Hoks

Nathan Hoks is the author of two books of poetry, Reveilles and The Narrow Circle, which was a winner of the 2012 National Poetry Series and published by Penguin. His translations, poems, and critical writings have appeared in journals such as The Colorado Review, jubilat, Crazyhorse, Lit, Circumference, Octopus Magazine, and Verse. A graduate of the Iowa Writers’ Workshop, Hoks works as an editor and letterpress printer for Convulsive Editions, a micro-press that publishes chapbooks and broadsides. 

Annie Janusch

Annie Janusch is the translator of four novels by Wolf Haas, the Heinrich von Kleist novella The Duel, as well as works by Jürgen Goldstein, Anja Kampmann, Walter Kappacher, and Uwe Tellkamp. She has been an editor and reviewer for the journals Chicago Review, The Quarterly Conversation, Two Lines, and Translation Review. A former Robert Bosch Fellow at the University of Leipzig, Janusch holds an MFA from the University of Iowa and a 2017 Literature Translation Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts.   

David MacLean

David Stuart MacLean is a PEN/American award-winning essayist. His essays and stories have appeared in Ploughshares, Guernica, Bennington Review, Quarterly West, Gulf Coast, The New York Times, the Guardian, and on the radio program This American Life. He is the author of the memoir The Answer to the Riddle Is Me, which won Best Memoir/Biography by the Society of Midland Authors and was named one of the Best Books of 2014 by Kirkus Reviews. He has a PhD in Literature/Creative Writing from the University of Houston, was a Fulbright Scholar in India, and is a co-founder of the award-winning Poison Pen Reading Series.

Mickle Maher
Mickle Maher

Mickle Maher is a cofounder of Chicago’s Theater Oobleck and the author of numerous plays, including An Apology for the Course and Outcome of Certain Events Delivered by Doctor John Faustus on This His Final Evening, and The Hunchback Variations. Recent plays include The Strangerer, Spirits to Enforce (Theater Oobleck),Cyrano (translator) and The Cabinet (Redmoon Theater), and Lady Madeline (Steppenwolf). His plays have appeared Off-Broadway and in numerous theaters around the world. He is published by Hope and Nonthings. He has been the recipient of a Creative Capital grant (for The Strangerer) and, recently, an NEA grant to develop his Hunchback Variations into an opera. He currently teaches at the University of Chicago.

Jeff McMahon
Jeff McMahon

Jeff McMahon covers green technology, energy and the environment for Forbes. His byline has appeared under the banner of daily newspapers including the Chicago Tribune and the Arizona Republic, alternative weeklies including New Times and Newcity, and innovators in online journalism including The New York Times Company's Lifewire syndicate and The Weather Channel's climate-change site, Forecast Earth. A specialist in environmental reporting, he has won dozens of awards for news writing and commentary, including top honors from the National Society of Newspaper Columnists. He has also published essays on writers and writing with PEN International magazine. A graduate of Chicago's Master of Arts Program in the Humanities, he is a founding editor, along with other MAPH alumni, of Contrary magazine. He also serves as MAPH's writing advisor.

Ariana Nash
Ariana Nash

Ariana Nadia Nash is the author of the poetry collection Instructions for Preparing Your Skin (Anhinga Press, 2013), which won the 2011 Philip Levine Prize for Poetry. She has also published the chapbook Our Blood Is Singing (Damask Press, 2012). She has won a Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Prize and has been awarded residencies at the MacDowell Colony, the Kimmel Harding Nelson Center for the Arts, and the Helene Wurlitzer Foundation. She has an MFA from the University of North Carolina Wilmington and an MA from the University of Chicago. 

Peter O'Leary
Peter O'Leary

Peter O’Leary graduated from the College and the Divinity School. He has published three books of poetry, Watchfulness (Sputen Duyvil), Depth Theology (Georgia), and Luminous Epinoia (Cultural Society), as well as a book of literary criticism, Gnostic Contagion: Robert Duncan & the Poetry of Illness (Welseyan). As Ronald Johnson’s literary executor, he has edited three books: To Do As Adam Did: Selected Poems (Talisman), The Shrubberies (Flood), and Radi os (Flood). Two new Ronald Johnson books, The Outworks and a new edition of ARK are both forthcoming from Flood. Likewise, a selected poems of John Taggart, Is Music, which he edited, has been published by Copper Canyon. He is a longtime editor of LVNG, an advisory editor for the Cultural Society, and an integral member of the Chicago Poetry Project.